A year of 200 books

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A year of 200 books

Somehow, in the midst of the political and ecological hellscape that was 2017, I managed to read over 200 books. (The exact number is debateable, for ontological reasons that will be eludicated shortly.) This achievement was mediated by the unyielding technological sadism of a Goodreads reading challenge, with its brutally effective reminders of far behind I was at any given moment:

an extremely stressful progress indicator

The experience of forcing myself to read so many books in 2017—after reading less than a third of that number in 2016 and barely any in 2015—turned out to be quite transformative. I changed a lot as a person (for the better, I think). What follows is a write-up of my journey: why I did this, how I did it, and what I learned. I’m hoping this retrospective this will encourage others to read more, or introduce them to books they wouldn’t have heard of otherwise.

For a more visual summary of my experience, check out My Year in Books which Goodreads has so kindly automatically generated for me. I’ve also broadly categorised my books (or at least most of them) by theme, which you can find at the end of this post. I’m happy to answer questions or give personal recommendations about any of these books, and I’ve written Goodreads reviews for a bunch of them as well (feel free to add me if we have similar tastes!).

Why I did this

I was a voracious reader as a kid, but my desire to read new books slowed to a trickle by the time I started university. Any potential book-reading time was spent writing code or reading ephemeral and mostly unmemorable content on Hacker News, Reddit, and Twitter. When I did read books, I would usually just re-read the same old favourites that I had first read as a teenager—like the Discworld series and Cryptonomicon. I contented myself with revisiting the well-thumbed pages of a treasured few, not realising how much I was missing out on.

I started reading books in earnest again in the latter half of 2016. The UK had voted to leave the EU, Trump was on the verge of being elected, and my vanilla liberal political views were starting to feel unsatisfactory. Plus, my full-time job—my startup—had reached a stasis, where I didn’t have to do much work to keep it running and furthermore didn’t see much point in trying to grow it. So I had lots of free time, but a dearth of things I wanted to do with it.

At the end of 2016, I realised I was sick of startups and decided to apply for a masters degree on inequality. Given that I hadn’t done a single social science course in uni, I figured I’d need to read a lot if I wanted to catch up. Around the same time, a friend re-introduced me to David Foster Wallace. I had read his cruise ship essay as a teenager and loved it (mostly in a fit of adolescent rebellion revolving around a family cruise trip that I was determined to avoid), but I hadn’t gotten around to reading anything else he had written until December 2016, when I read the entirety of A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again and just fell in love with it.

On the brink of 2017, I had two main reading goals: 1) prepare myself for the degree; and 2) read everything by and about David Foster Wallace. I deliberately set a high reading goal for 2017 (at first 200, then 208 when I figured that 4/week would be easier to plan for) to force myself to stick with it.

How I did it

Let me start off by acknowledging that 200 is a ridiculously high number of books to read in a single year. I was lucky to have a lot of free time in 2017 (my masters program didn’t start until late September) as well as access to some excellent public and university libraries. I’ve seen some Goodreads challenges numbering in the high 200s, but those are quite rare, and I assume those who achieve them have envious lifestyles where they can spend most of their day reading. For the average person who works or studies full-time, being able to read (and actually appreciate) 200 average-length books in a single year is probably out of reach.

Even for someone with a lot of spare time, reading 200 books isn’t exactly easy to do. I’m not sure I achieved it either, depending on how you define a “book”. Anyone familiar with Goodhart’s law can probably guess what happened: the measure became a target. I definitely read some “books” (really: short stories and essays) simply because they were listed on Goodreads and I didn’t want to fall behind on my reading challenge, not because I actually wanted to read them.

What I learned

Would I do this again? I’m definitely not going to try and read 200 books in a year again, that’s for sure. 4 books a week is an absurd pace that threatened my sanity and compelled me to unfavorably alter my reading habits just to stay on track. I might do a smaller challenge for 2018 (50 or 100), just to keep myself accountable and make sure I don’t regress to my pre-book habits of watching frivolous TV shows and aimlessly browsing Twitter.

One thing I realised early in the year is that I was being introduced to a lot of new vocabulary and concepts at an incredibly rapid pace. If I wanted to actually remember what I was reading, I would need to find some way of taking notes, ideally digitally in order to facilitate searching/tagging. In typical software engineer fashion, I decided to build an app for this. It’s currently running at bookmarker.dellsystem.me (it’s kinda fragile—please don’t try to break it) and the code is on Github under an MIT license. It takes a lot of effort to keep it up-to-date, and I haven’t gotten around to filling in all my notes yet, but it’s so worth it. It’s helped me dramatically expand my vocabulary, and some of these new words are now so engrained in my consciousness that I can’t even remember a world without them. It’s also incredibly useful as a writing companion, as a means of storing quotes that I can cite in essays or use as inspiration when I’ve hit a block. If you wish you had something like Bookmarker for your own use, let me know because I am considering making it multi-user.

Overall, the reading challenge was a success, with some caveats. My biggest regrets come from the mechanics of the reading challenge itself: even beyond the incentives to read short books and eschew long ones, I constantly caved to a perverse “sunk cost” mentality where I felt like I had to finish any book that I made significant progress on, even if I didn’t really like it. I wasted a lot of time that way. On the other hand, without the challenge, I might not have gotten around to reading some truly lovely books that greatly influenced the way I think. I also started chipping away at my ignorance of several important fields (most notably political economy and literary theory). Still, though, I have a long way to go.

An incomplete attempt at categorising by theme

There was something really cathartic about the process of finding patterns in the books I’d read this year. Only in hindsight can I trace the threads of my personal book-led evolution: the year began with tentative and ultimately worthless forays as I didn’t really know what I was doing, but with time my taste solidified as I became more comfortable with the various fields and traditions. There were definitely lots of books that I regret reading, and I wish I could get that time back, but alas.

As you will see by the large David Foster Wallace grouping, I really got into his stuff this year. I even went to the annual David Foster Wallace conference in Illinois, which turned out to be such a wonderful experience that I plan to go again in 2018 (conference website built by yours truly!). Reading his work made me extremely envious of his writing ability, and so I started reading more contemporary literature and literary theory. At the same time, I was reading economics-type stuff in preparation for LSE, and the books I chose got more and more heterodox until I found myself firmly within the realm of critical theory, a field with which I was wholly unfamiliar and which nicely unified my two separate strands of reading. It’s hard for me to fully express how grateful I am to have discovered critical theory (and critiques of capitalism more broadly), and how much I’ve changed as a result. What I will say is that I started the year with only a hazy understanding of the term “neoliberalism” (I thought it was some kind of vague slur used to defame My Personal Hero, Hillary Clinton) and ended it having written multiple pieces for New Socialist on the perils of combining technological advances with a neoliberal outlook. The right books have a way of dramatically accelerating personal growth, if you only let them.

Below is a rough attempt at categorising what I’ve read, which I’ve compiled with the help of the Goodreads API. I’ve excluded some books that didn’t really fit in any category or that I’m just embarrassed to have read. Some books appear in multiple categories. I fully acknowledge that some of the groupings and categorisation choices are tenuous and do not plan to die on any of these hills.

Each book is linked to its page on Goodreads (if it exists) and is associated with a fairly reductive star-rating as well as a link to its page on Bookmarker, where my notes are stored (not all books have associated notes yet).

Top 18 recommendations, in order of reading

The Boy Kings: A Journey into the Heart of the Social Network
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative?
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
The New Prophets of Capital
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Does Capitalism Have a Future?
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Lit
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Lean Out
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Disassembly Required: A Field Guide to Actually Existing Capitalism
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Grand Hotel Abyss: The Lives of the Frankfurt School
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Close to the Machine: Technophilia and Its Discontents
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
How Will Capitalism End? Essays on a Failing System
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
October: The Story of the Russian Revolution
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Left Hemisphere: Mapping Contemporary Theory
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Literary Theory: An Introduction
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Philosophy and Social Hope
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Aesthetics and Politics
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Infinite Jest
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
The Consumer Society: Myths and Structures
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM

The rabbit hole of David Foster Wallace studies

Both Flesh and Not: Essays
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Brief Interviews with Hideous Men
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Consider the Lobster and Other Essays
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Oblivion
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
This Is Water: Some Thoughts, Delivered on a Significant Occasion, about Living a Compassionate Life
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
The Pale King
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Girl with Curious Hair
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
The Broom of the System
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Infinite Jest
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Fate, Time, and Language: An Essay on Free Will
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Signifying Rappers: Rap and Race in the Urban Present
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The Future of Fiction
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The David Foster Wallace Reader
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Sonora Review DFW Tribute
☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ BM
The Last Interview and Other Conversations
☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ BM
Conversations with David Foster Wallace
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Quack This Way: David Foster Wallace & Bryan A. Garner Talk Language and Writing
☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ BM
Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself: A Road Trip with David Foster Wallace
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Every Love Story Is a Ghost Story: A Life of David Foster Wallace
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
Understanding David Foster Wallace
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
David Foster Wallace and "The Long Thing": New Essays on the Novels
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
David Foster Wallace: Fiction and Form
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The Unspeakable Failures of David Foster Wallace: Language, Identity, and Resistance
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The Legacy of David Foster Wallace
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The Gospel According to David Foster Wallace: Boredom and Addiction in an Age of Distraction
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Consider David Foster Wallace
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
David Foster Wallace's Balancing Books: Fictions of Value
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Existentialist Engagement in Wallace, Eggers and Foer: A Philosophical Analysis of Contemporary American Literature
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
David Foster Wallace: Presences of the Other
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Bough Down
☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ BM
Lit
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Farther Away
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
How Fiction Works
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Changing My Mind: Occasional Essays
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM

Other contemporary (fiction, essays, memoirs)

Private Citizens
★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ BM
The Sellout
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The Underground Railroad
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Ready Player One
★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ BM
What is the What
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Zodiac
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Bit Rot
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The Last Days of New Paris
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Tenth of December
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
High Fidelity
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
How We Are Hungry
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
Purity
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
All the Birds in the Sky
★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ BM
The Embassy of Cambodia
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
Austerlitz
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
Between the World and Me
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
How to Be Alone
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Against Everything: Essays
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
The Discomfort Zone: A Personal History
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
A Man Without a Country
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The Brain-Dead Megaphone: Essays
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
The Fun Stuff: And Other Essays
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The Nearest Thing To Life
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
In Praise of Messy Lives: Essays
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
Changing My Mind: Occasional Essays
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Some Remarks: Essays and Other Writing
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The Faraway Nearby
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Bit Rot
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Adventures in Marxism
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
Uncle Tungsten
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The German Comedy: Scenes of Life After the Wall
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Lit
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Farther Away
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Emergency Sex (and Other Desperate Measures): True Stories from a War Zone
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Bottoms Up
☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ BM
A Thousand Hills: Rwanda's Rebirth and the Man Who Dreamed It
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
The Point Issue 14
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM

Classic literature/essays

Collected Poems
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Exile and the Kingdom
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
Notes From Underground
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
The Complete Short Stories
☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ BM
Selected Poems
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
The Old Man and the Sea
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
Every Man Dies Alone
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Resistance, Rebellion and Death: Essays
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Against Interpretation and Other Essays
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
Mythologies: The Complete Edition, in a New Translation
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM

Philosophy and social/cultural theory

The Routledge Guidebook to Plato's Republic
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Literary Theory: An Introduction
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Discourse on the Origin of Inequality
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
What is an Author?
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
What is Literature?
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Deconstruction: Theory and Practice
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Aesthetics and Politics
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Philosophy and Social Hope
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
The Philosophy of Marx
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
Grand Hotel Abyss: The Lives of the Frankfurt School
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Left Hemisphere: Mapping Contemporary Theory
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Specters of Marx
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The Ecology of Attention
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Redistribution or Recognition? A Political-Philosophical Exchange
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
Fragments: Cool Memories III, 1990-1995
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Adventures in Marxism
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The Function of Criticism
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
The Meaning of Life
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The Consumer Society: Myths and Structures
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Technology and Social Power
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
Willing Slaves of Capital: Spinoza and Marx on Desire
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Violence
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Malign Velocities: Accelerationism and Capitalism
☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ BM

Technology criticism

Hatching Twitter: A True Story of Money, Power, Friendship, and Betrayal
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Disrupted: My Misadventure in the Start-Up Bubble
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The Boy Kings: A Journey into the Heart of the Social Network
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Chaos Monkeys: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
No Exit: Struggling to Survive a Modern Gold Rush
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Close to the Machine: Technophilia and Its Discontents
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Who Owns the Future?
★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ BM
Tech Against Trump
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
World Without Mind
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Technology and Social Power
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
Digital Labour and Karl Marx
☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ BM
Cutting Code: Software and Sociality
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
Software Studies: A Lexicon
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Content: Selected Essays on Technology, Creativity, Copyright, and the Future of the Future
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
Platform Capitalism
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
To Save Everything, Click Here: Technology, Solutionism, and the Urge to Fix Problems that Don't Exist
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The PlayStation Dreamworld
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
Ours to Hack and to Own
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The Black Box Society: The Secret Algorithms That Control Money and Information
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
A Hacker Manifesto
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
#Accelerate: The Accelerationist Reader
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
The Industries of the Future
★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ BM

Accessible leftist critiques

The Death of Homo Economicus: Work, Debt and the Myth of Endless Accumulation
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The Divide: A Brief Guide to Global Inequality and its Solutions
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
And the Weak Suffer What They Must?
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The Bonds of Debt
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Utopia or Bust: A Guide to the Present Crisis
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative?
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Four Futures: Life after Capitalism
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
The New Prophets of Capital
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Class War: The Privatization of Childhood
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Big Capital: Who Is London For?
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Lean Out
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
The ABCs of Socialism
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Uneven and Combined
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Earth, Wind, & Fire
☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ BM
The First Red Century
☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ BM
Rank and File
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
Journey to the Dark Side
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Work: Capitalism. Economics. Resistance
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Kill All Normies: Online Culture Wars from 4chan and Tumblr to Trump and the Alt-Right
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
Inventing the Future: Postcapitalism and a World Without Work
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
The Bleeding Edge: Why Technology Turns Toxic in an Unequal World
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Disassembly Required: A Field Guide to Actually Existing Capitalism
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Why Marx Was Right
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM

Politics, history, race, etc

Racism without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Austerity: The History of a Dangerous Idea
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Out of the Wreckage: A New Politics in the Age of Crisis
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Corbyn and the Future of Labour: A Verso Report
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Against Elections: The Case for Democracy
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
Against the Double Blackmail: Refugees, Terror and Other Troubles with the Neighbours
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
How to Resist: Turn Protest to Power
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
October: The Story of the Russian Revolution
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The Establishment: And How They Get Away with It
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Debt: The First 5,000 Years
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
A Dreadful Deceit: The Myth of Race from the Colonial Era to Obama's America
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
Dragon Ladies: Asian American Feminists Breathe Fire
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The Communist Manifesto
☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ BM
The April Theses
☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ BM
Between the World and Me
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
A Thousand Hills: Rwanda's Rebirth and the Man Who Dreamed It
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM

Mainstream(ish) economics

Chronicles: On Our Political and Economic Crisis
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Why Save the Bankers?: And Other Essays on Our Economic and Political Crisis
☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ BM
The Economics of Inequality
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Capital in the Twenty-First Century
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The Great Divide: Unequal Societies and What We Can Do About Them
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Inequality: What Can Be Done?
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Social Class in the 21st Century
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Basic Income: And How We Can Make It Happen
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
GDP: A Brief But Affectionate History
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
The Wealth of Humans: Work and its Absence in the Twenty-First Century
☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ BM
The Industries of the Future
★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ BM
The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM

More academic critiques (of capitalism)

Catalyst Volume 1 No. 2
☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ BM
Cognitive Capitalism
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
#Accelerate: The Accelerationist Reader
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
The Forms of Capital
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Historical Capitalism with Capitalist Civilization
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Profiting Without Producing: How Finance Exploits Us All
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Trouble in Paradise: From the End of History to the End of Capitalism
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
The Trouble with Capitalism: An Enquiry Into the Causes of Global Economic Failure
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
Postcapitalism: A Guide to Our Future
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
23 Things They Don't Tell You About Capitalism
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
Seventeen Contradictions and the End of Capitalism
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Buying Time: The Delayed Crisis of Democratic Capitalism
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
The Enigma of Capital: and the Crises of Capitalism
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
How Will Capitalism End? Essays on a Failing System
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Does Capitalism Have a Future?
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Marx, Capital and the Madness of Economic Reason
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
Thomas Piketty's 'Capital in the Twenty First Century': An Introduction
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM
The Production of Money: How to Break the Power of Bankers
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
New Left Review 92
★ ★ ★ ★ ☆ BM
New Left Review 82
★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆ BM
New Left Review 91
★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BM